Archive for December, 2010

Dec

31

2010

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Top 10 Posts of 2010!

Hello valued readers! We’ve enjoyed hanging out with you here on the blog this year! Below are some highlights of posts that you loved!

  • We started a blog series called “How to” to feature some things to help you in your ministry! Things like facebook, twitter, how to minister to specific types of kids, and much more!
  • Many times we don’t see what goes on Behind the Scenes of the Production process. JE did a series that introduces us to the talent behind CentriKid programming. Meet Amy Haywood, Jeff Venable, and Seth Worley.
  • November 11, 2010 was National OMC Day! Here’s a video post that shows how we celebrated!
  • We had a very important announcement about new things for CK Worship!
  • Our Nashville Office team recently recorded this December Vidcast that has some great information about getting ready for camp! If you haven’t already watched it, you should soon!
  • Just like every year, CentriKid Camps provided some pretty awesome After-Thanksgiving Specials!
  • OMC Christmas Edition is here!
  • Children’s Ministers everywhere will thank Tim Munoz for his Fundraising suggestion using the Kroger Cares program.
  • Who could forget Photo Fridays? We had so much fun collecting and displaying your pictures from camp!
  • Courtney from the Nashville office went to camp this summer! Click here to see videos of her experience!

Now that you’ve had a review of what’s happened on CentriKidblog.com, you’re ready for 2011!

 

CentriKid

CentriKid is a 5 day, 4 night camp for 3rd - 6th graders to experience the time of their lives and learn more about the message of Jesus Christ!

Dec

29

2010

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Taboo Words: Baptism

This past summer, we talked about what it means to be adopted into God’s family at camp.

“What does it mean to be adopted into God’s family or to be a follower of Jesus?”

“Have you been baptized?” Response: “Yep, I got baptized when I was 7. The water was really cold.”

During camp, we hear kids mistake baptism for a salvation experience over and over again.  I think we are missing a huge opportunity to explain that baptism is a response to the Holy Spirit drawing us to be in a relationship with Christ and is a symbol of a decision we have made to have Jesus be in control of our lives and our Savior. It is in outward symbol of the inward cleansing God has done, or in kid language, it is us showing others that God has changed our lives and forgiven our sin (or all the bad stuff that we do). When we ask Jesus to be the Lord of our life, we become a new creation. It’s like we are born again…and that’s what baptism symbolizes. Us dying to our sin (going into the water) and being born again as a new creation (coming out of the water).

It is important to help kids know that baptism doesn’t make us a new creation, Jesus does. Through Jesus’s death and resurrection (coming back from death) we are saved. Baptism is a reminder of that.

 

Here are some Scriptures about baptism to go through with kids:
Jesus is baptized:: Matthew 3:13-16
Romans 6:3-5
Colossians 2:12-15
Acts 2:38-41

Other Taboo Words:
#1:Ask Jesus into your Heart
#2:Walk with God
#3:Blood of the Lamb
#4:Born Again
#5: Check YES or NO

  ((baptism photo from flbaptist.org))

Mary Carlisle

Mary is a University of Mobile grad, with a BA in English and Theology. She worked with CentriKid Camp starting as a staffer in 2007 and began working in the camp office in 2010. She joined the VBS team in November of 2012.

Dec

22

2010

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10 Road Trip Essentials

Many of you will be traveling for the holidays, so I put together some essentials for my holiday travel from when I was on the road scouting out new locations for CentriKid Camps a few weeks ago.  If you plan to spend a lot of time in the car or in airport security, you’ll need the right gear.  Everybody has their typical stuff to take when heading out of town, so here is my top 10 list of road trip essentials:


  1. Gameplan.  Funny movies are built on the premise of a fly by the seat of your pants adventure … but having a sane holiday or successful business-related trips is not.  A little time spent doing your homework ahead of time can save miles, hours, and money.
  2. Roadmap.  My iPhone has officially replaced the WalMart atlas as my official map of choice.
  3. Travel Charger.  When your entire plan for directions is built on an electronic device … that electronic device must have a charge.  #experiencespeaking
  4. Notepad & Pen.  At times I’ve fooled myself into thinking that I’ll remember all the details of a meeting, a conversation, a site visit …. and the truth of the matter is that it all starts to run together after multiple meetings, multiple conversations, etc…
  5. Gum.  This helps me reduce my number of stops in a couple of ways… if I’m sorta hungry, but on a quarter-tank of gas, I can chew gum and hold out til time to fill up with gas.  And if I’m eating and filling up with gas at the same time, it means I’m buying less cokes, which means I’m drinking less cokes, which means I’m stopping less … you get the picture.
  6. Friends along the way.  If you’ve ever worked camp, then you now have friends all across the country, so there isn’t a place you can go without seeing somebody you know, right?  In my case on a recent business trip, I stayed with my in-laws and it was fun to get to visit with them!  If you are going to see family, perhaps there are some friends you need to re-connect with along the way.
  7. Kindle.  I’m a big reader, so I’ve always got a couple of books that I’m working on.  When waiting in the airport or catching a plane I’m able to have lots of uninterrupted reading time.  Right now I’m reading the newest Grisham novel (The Confession).
  8. DVD.  When wrapping up the day, I love to throw a movie or tv show dvd into the laptop… right now I’m re-watching LOST.
  9. Hands-Free Device / Earbuds.  While driving, I gotta have my hands free during a call.  I don’t wanna navigate traffic in a new town while trying to hold on to the cell.  This lets me keep connected with home as well as touch base with upcoming appointments.  #drive-time #productivity
  10. Flexibility.  My notebook contains the agenda for my trip and essential numbers if I’ve got questions or need to re-schedule an appointment.  So as important as it is to have a gamplan, it is just as important to be able to adjust it on the fly.  Last week, I flipped my agenda and went to my campus visits in reverse order so I could avoid rush hour traffic.  Flexibility is priceless!

So what other things do you consider road trip essentials?  Got any tips or gadgets to share?

Jeremy Echols

JE leads the camp team, finds new camp locations, plans training, and lots of other projects. He loves spending family time with his wife Emily and their daughter Madison.

Dec

17

2010

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Never Waste of Good Crisis

A great friend and mentor of mine, Dave Melber, has a number of great sayings.  One is “never waste a good crisis.”  My dad might have said, “find the silver lining behind every cloud”, but I like “never waste a good crisis.” We tend to talk in crisis language these days… the economy is bad; my pastor doesn’t understand me; parents don’t pick up their kids after class…  Everything seems bigger than it is.  So when a real crisis hits don’t waste it use it.  If the economy is bad and you can’t afford as much “stuff,” then figure out what you don’t need and never buy it again.  When you lose a Sunday School teacher, make some needed personnel changes.

 

It makes we want to look for a crisis.  For some people, it is the only way they ever change anything.

 



Dec

15

2010

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Listen More Talk Less

I will admit I am not as good at listening as I want to be.  My wife says, and she is right, that I always feel like someone has to be talking, so if there is silence I try to fill it.  Who doesn’t want to be heard? I have a great friend who pauses while talking, as if he puts a period in his sentence. Just as you start to talk he taps you on the arm and continues talking over you.  Needless to say, a few people stopped riding in the car pool.

Truth is, my wife doesn’t want answers, she just wants me to care.  No one likes the guy in the meeting that always has something to say.  We all admire the person that speaks when they have something to say, something we want to hear, something worth saying.  However, we love the person that cares more about what we have to say than what they have to say.  So next time you start to speak, don’t.

 



Dec

14

2010

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Mentoring

Last year one of our CentriKid Camp interns, Mary, asked me about my mentor and how I got started meeting with him.  She was looking to find a mentor and trying to figure out how to get started.  I was honored but I had no idea if I did it “right” or not…and I’m sure it looks different in every situation.

Here is what I shared with Mary as my 2-cents-worth about approaching a mentor and asking for their time:
  1. Ask them if they have done this before and if they have advice on how to get it started.  Ask for advice from “whatever their position in the company or stage in life” to “whatever your position or stage is”.
  2. Identify a time period if you are are doing a multiple session type of thing…6 months, a year…every two weeks, once a month. Be clear so you don’t ask a very busy person to commit an undetermined amount of time to you.
  3. Start with briefly explaining the reason why you wanna talk to them whether it’s a one-time chat or an on-going thing. Let them know what you have observed or been told and they will probably be very appreciative of the affirmation.
  4. Listen more than you talk.  There may be times you need to vent, and a mentor can be a good outlet for that…oftentimes healthier and more productive than venting to a co-worker.  But the more you listen, the more you will learn.
  5. Have questions ready…sometimes I’ve gone into it with a topic rather than a question, but the questions emerged as we got into discussing the topic.
  6. Make it personal. There are probably very valid arguments against this…but I think the advice means more, the learning is more effective, and the experience is more fun if you get to know each other on a more personal level.
  7. Be ready to take notes. I always have some way of jotting down notes…but not every chat warrants it. Just don’t get caught with no way to record essential details….but remember you aren’t a court reporter so don’t write every word down. The best learning for me has taken place when I jot down highlights after a chat is over.
  8. Do something with what you learned. If you only store the knowledge in a notebook or hold it in your head, then what’s the point.
  9. Make it what you need it to be and what you want it to be. A mentor is a privilege and an opportunity. Not an assignment. If it isn’t fun or beneficial, then steer it in a different direction or end it…don’t let it become a beating.
  10. Pass it on.  Look for opportunities to share what you’ve learned with another person who comes along behind you in the organization or in life.  The best lessons are worth passing down to the next generation.

Jeremy Echols

JE leads the camp team, finds new camp locations, plans training, and lots of other projects. He loves spending family time with his wife Emily and their daughter Madison.

Dec

10

2010

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(Guest Blog: Bill Emeott) 5 Things Every Children’s Minister Should Know

Hey!  My name is Bill Emeott and I have the privilege of serving alongside the CentriKID team here at LifeWay. I serve as the Lead Childhood Ministry Specialist and have been in that role at LifeWay for 8 years. Before coming to LifeWay I served as a Children’s Minister in the metro Atlanta area for several years.  Currently, I’m a 4th grade Sunday School teacher…. AND LOVE IT!

Below, you will find five things I believe every Children’s Minister should know!  These are things I learned the hard way… so, consider my experiences and maybe you won’t have to “stump your toe” on these commonly made mistakes.

  1.  Take Care of Yourself.  It’s so important that you take care of yourself physically, spiritually, emotionally, and mentally.  You can only give from your emptiness for so long and it will catch up with you.  FIND THE TIME to stay connected to God. FIND THE TIME to exercise. FIND THE TIME to socialize with other growing ADULT Christians. FIND THE TIME to learn and stretch your mind.  If you don’t take care of yourself, no one else will.
  2. Know What You Believe and Why You Believe It! Make sure you’ve considered some of the major issues in Kids Ministry (Children and Salvation, Children’s Worship, Curriculum, Activities) and know what you believe and why you believe it.  You will be challenged along the way, so make sure you’ve considered why you do what you do.  It’s a lot easier to lead when you know where you’re going!
  3. People are More Important than Programs.  Invest in people (the kids, the teachers, the parents) and allow the programs, policies, and procedures to minister to the people. At the end of the day… it’s all about relationships. Programs minus people equal nothing.
  4. Organization is Your Best Friend!  No one wants to be a part of an unorganized mess. Have fun, but be professional. Don’t be known as the “slacker” minister. Make sure you think through your goals and implement them with organization.  At the end of the day, you’ll accomplish more and rest better!
  5. Give Away Your Ministry.  Once you get organized, work your organization. I’ve been known to say, “Only do what only you can do.” Don’t be lazy, be a team player, but give it away.  God has called us to equip the church to do the ministry… not do it all by ourselves. Multiply the ministry that God has called you to through the team He has given you.

There are a lot of other things that I wish I had learned early on… but these are just a few that stand out for me. I pray that you’ll take the time to consider this list, add a few of your own and get busy doing the Kingdom work God’s called you to.

Follow me on twitter (Bill_Emeott) or follow me on the Kids Ministry 101 blog.  I’ll look forward to following you, too!

 

CentriKid

CentriKid is a 5 day, 4 night camp for 3rd - 6th graders to experience the time of their lives and learn more about the message of Jesus Christ!

Dec

9

2010

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Christmas Links!

Looking for some ministry helps, parenting ideas, or practical ways to teach kids about the real meaning of Christmas?  Here are some great blogs and articles we found across the web… enjoy!

10 Ways to Give Christ to Your Kids at Christmas Part 1 and Part 2 from Rolling Hills Community Church.

 

Tips on cultivating patience with your kids this Christmas from Pete Wilson at Cross Point Church.

 

Growing Generosity in Your Kids at Christmas from Dr. Tim Elmore (a guest blog on Michael Hyatt’s blog).

 

Do you have others? If so, share them in our comments!

Meredith Teasley

Meredith studied at Samford University and Beeson Divinity School. She worked camp for 8 years, then served in full-time children's ministry in Virginia before joining our team in January 2009.

December VidCast

Watch the video below to meet the CentriKid office team and to hear our December VidCast!

 

Thanks for watching … we mentioned a lot of details, so here are all those important links:

If you are registered for camp, you will get 5 of your spots converted to FREE spots (over $1200 value) for every *new* group of 20 or more that you get to register for camp.  You need to email CentriKid to let us know who they are & they need to register between now and Dec 31, 2010.  

 Coming Soon!

  • group orders for CentriKid backpacks, shirts, and water bottles can be placed after Christmas
  • CentriKid Group Leader Information will be available to download after New Year

Jeremy Echols

JE leads the camp team, finds new camp locations, plans training, and lots of other projects. He loves spending family time with his wife Emily and their daughter Madison.

“What did he say his name was?”

How many times have I been in that situation?  Just met somebody at church, had a nice chat, figured out a mutual acquaintance, and as soon as he walks away I can’t quite recall if his name was Scott or Steve.  Fail.

At CentriKid, we work hard at building relationships with the folks we encounter along the way, and an important way to show value to a campus contact, a church sponsor, or a kid at camp is to learn his name.  You do the same at church with new members, prospects you’ve encountered, or the friend who visited with a buddy.

This article caught my eye because of its practical advice about remembering normal names and irregular names too.  But beware, it is an outside link, and the bullet points are good, but he’s a little careless with his language in some of the explanations.

I’ve made some progress at learning names by repeating them in the conversation and by finding some type of common ground so I can make an association later on.  But there are always those moments when I’m careless or just plain forget.  The fear of embarrassment or of insulting a new acquaintance is often enough motivation to keep me on top of my game.  What do you do to remember names when you meet someone new?  And be honest… how successful are you at recalling names later on?

Jeremy Echols

JE leads the camp team, finds new camp locations, plans training, and lots of other projects. He loves spending family time with his wife Emily and their daughter Madison.