Archive for April, 2012

Ministering to the Kid that Chronically Misbehaves

You know that kid. The one that tests you to your limit and makes you want to scream or pull your hair out. Do you have that kid in your mind now? I’m sure he comes every time you teach.

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How do you handle that kid? Do you just pray for the end of class? Here are some practical ways that you can minister to this kid:

1. If he behaves well, brag on him to his parents like crazy and use him as an example in front of the class. Make him your helper. Tell his mom how great he was.

2. Don’t let your class be derailed by her misbehaving. Keep going. Have another adult tend to Jenny’s fit. If necessary, an adult can walk outside with her and offer her some choices.

3. Give him a choice. Make sure they know it is a choice and that choices have consequences, but you are hoping that he makes a good choice.  Make good choices can be one of the rules you go over at the beginning of class. “Bradley, you have a choice. You can either stop hitting Ellie with your pencil and listen or you can go sit against the wall” or “Jason, you have a choice to make. You can either continue playing when we should be listening or you can tell your mom about why you just couldn’t pay attention today when she comes to get you.”

What are some ways that you have seen are great ways to redirect poor behavior? What are some ways you really seek to invest in those kids?

Check out these other posts within this series and watch for more coming in the next few weeks:
Ministering to the Artsy Kid
Ministering to the Smart Kid
Ministering to Kids with Sick Parents
Ministering to Kids with Divorced Parents
Ministering to the Non-Cooperative Kid
Ministering to the Kid that Doesn’t Want to be There

Mary Carlisle serves on the CentriKid office team and is the director of CK3 at Millsaps College. Mary loves teaching kids at church and at an inner city ministry in Nashville and is passionate about kids discipleship. Follow Mary on twitter and check out her personal blog. 

Mary Carlisle

Mary is a University of Mobile grad, with a BA in English and Theology. She worked with CentriKid Camp starting as a staffer in 2007 and began working in the camp office in 2010. She joined the VBS team in November of 2012.

Apr

27

2012

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Planning Your Trip to Camp

 

Jeremy Echols

JE leads the camp team, finds new camp locations, plans training, and lots of other projects. He loves spending family time with his wife Emily and their daughter Madison.

8 Terms to Know About Preteen & Dating

 

Preteen dating is not something that should be taken lightly. In fact, statistics show that preteen dating can lead to serious problems. Depending on whom you talk to, each of the following terms can have a different definition. But this glossary should give parents an idea of what their children are talking about when they mention dating or a relationship. Discussing these terms with your child now can help you set guidelines for the future as you seek God’s plan for his life.

Image: tungphoto / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 

  • Talking — When a boy and girl are “talking,” they are casually flirting and showing interest in each other. Most of the time, they are not ready to commit to a relationship and are testing the waters to see if their relationship can go further.
  • Drop-Off Dating — Drop-off dating occurs when parents drop their preteen off somewhere they think is safe such as a mall, skating ring, or movie theater. What parents may not realize is often after they are dropped off, their children are picked up and taken to another location.
  • Going Out — When two preteens say they are “going out,” they probably mean they are in a relationship that is recognized by their peers as exclusive. Terms like “boyfriend” and “girlfriend” are used. Preteens can “go out” without going anywhere on a date.
  • Group Dating — Group dating can be chaperoned or unchaperoned. When preteens group date, they may go out with older friends who drive. Caution: Going on group dates no longer means that your child is safe from being physically intimate (especially if your preteen group dates with older couples). Many teens and preteens now act the same way in front of their friends that they would alone. In fact, sometimes being with friends actually makes it more difficult for preteens to say  “no” to situations in which they are uncomfortable.
  • Family Dating — For many, family dating is a good alternative to secular dating. After searching God’s Word and listening to each other, families can choose their own rules and relationship guidelines. Family dating allows parents to get to know their child’s friends in a more natural setting while it still keeps children under the protection and guidance of their parents.
  • Courtship — Courtship is a “no nonsense” approach to finding a mate. Courtship is not a casual dating relationship. In fact, some couples wait until marriage to kiss each other. Generally, in courtship, a man will pursue a woman with the ultimate goal of finding a spouse. She, in turn, has the benefit of her family’s support and of knowing the man who is pursuing her is seriously seeking God’s plan for their future instead of a casual relationship.
  • FWB (Friends with benefits) — Two good friends who do not want to be in a boy/girl relationship. Instead, they become involved physically whenever it “just happens.”
  • Hooking Up — The term “hooking up” equals every parent’s nightmare. And, it does happen with preteens. When two preteens hook up, they get together for one party, one night, or even just one hour. Sometimes, they know each other, and sometimes, they do not. It really does not matter because there are no strings attached, no commitments, and no plans to ever develop a relationship.

It’s important for parents to set guidelines and expectations for their preteens and to talk openly and regularly about their relationships.

Mia Pinson writes regularly for ParentLife magazine and is a middle school teacher in South Carolina.  Check out the ParentLife blog and get regular updates on the ParentLife Facebook page or from Twitter – @ParentLife.
 

CentriKid

CentriKid is a 5 day, 4 night camp for 3rd - 6th graders to experience the time of their lives and learn more about the message of Jesus Christ!

Apr

24

2012

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2012 Camp Prep #13: What to Expect When You Arrive at Camp

Mary Carlisle serves on the CentriKid office team and serves as the Camp Director for the CK3 team at Millsaps College. She trains our staff on what registration should look like, and wants to make sure that you always have a great experience as soon as you get on campus. Follow Mary on twitter.

Mary Carlisle

Mary is a University of Mobile grad, with a BA in English and Theology. She worked with CentriKid Camp starting as a staffer in 2007 and began working in the camp office in 2010. She joined the VBS team in November of 2012.

Apr

23

2012

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3 Games to Use in Your KidMin

Bandaid Tag

One person is “it.” Whenever someone is tagged by “it” they must hold a bandaid (their hand) on the spot where they were tagged. Then the game continues. When someone runs out of bandaids, (they get tagged three times), they are frozen until two other people come over to them and “operate.” The two other people need to tag the frozen person at the same time and count to five. Let the game continue for as long as it remains exciting and fun. Switch the person who is “it” often.

 

Kingpin

Kingpin is similar to the game Jailbreak. This activity works well with groups sized from 14 to 50+ kids.

Each team has 5 cones or bowling pins set up roughly 20-30 feet from a mid-line. On each side, there is also designated a jail for the other team, a 6′ x 6′ mat works well. Line up all balls, rubber-coated foam ball are best, on the mid-line.

Teams should line up behind their cones or pins. On “go,” the teams rush the mid-line to gain control of the balls. After a countdown from 5, the players may start to throw the balls in an attempt to knock down the other team’s cones or pins. The first team to knock down the other side’s cones or pins is declared the winner. (Once a pin is knocked down, even by the team guarding it, it must remain down.) This is the FIRST way to win.

While attempting to knock down the cones or pins, players may also be knocked out by being hit with a ball OR having their thrown ball caught on the fly by the opposing team. Once out, the player must cross to the other team’s jail. While in jail, should any “jailed” player catch a ball thrown to them by their own team, everyone in the jail gets a free walk back to their side. If a team knocks out ALL the players on the opposite team, they win the match. This is the SECOND way to win the game.

 

Monarch

Set-up—Create boundaries for a playing area. Make it big enough for the group to have enough space to run around safely. Choose a ball that is heavy enough to be thrown but not so heavy that it could be painful to the players. Gator balls work very well.

Play—The game begins with one Monarch. This person starts with the ball and is technically the “It”. As the only Monarch, this person can run with the ball and try to hit another player with it. As soon as another player has been hit with the ball they become a Monarch as well and game play changes slightly. With more than one Monarch whoever is holding the ball can NO LONGER MOVE WITH IT. All the other Monarchs can move without the ball but the person with the ball must stand still. The ball can be passed from Monarch to Monarch in an attempt hit other players with it creating more Monarchs. Play the game until there is one person left.

Check- In—Occasionally, it will be necessary to find out who the Monarchs are and who they are not. The leader of the game will call out “Monarchs show yourselves!” At this point, the game is paused and everyone who is a Monarch must crouch down and touch the ground. The game continues when the leader says “Monarchs go get them.”

 

Jessica Herrell, Department Intern, loves to play games… in fact, that’s what she studied in college! Jess posts lots of games on the blog, so check them out to find some you can use.

Jessica Herrell

Jessica is a Maryville College grad with a Physical Ed and Health degree, and has worked at camp since 2009. Jessica joined our office team as the department intern in August 2011.

Apr

20

2012

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We are getting ready for a GREAT conference!

We are so excited about the Kids Ministry Conference October 8-11! We have a fantastic line-up of speakers and worship you won’t want to miss. Come and get rejuvenated for another year of ministry, while learning some of the newest ideas and networking with some great children’s ministers from across the country. If you love CentriKid, you will definitely love the Kids Ministry Conference that will be at Ridgecrest Conference Center in Ridgecrest, NC.

Check out the brand new KMC website for more information!

 

Mary Carlisle serves on the CentriKid team and serves as Camp Director for the CK3 team at Millsaps College. She loves being involved in the Kids Ministry Conference and is always looking for vendors and fun people to invite to join us. Follow Mary on twitter.

Mary Carlisle

Mary is a University of Mobile grad, with a BA in English and Theology. She worked with CentriKid Camp starting as a staffer in 2007 and began working in the camp office in 2010. She joined the VBS team in November of 2012.

Apr

20

2012

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O M Tweet Pictures!

We had a blast playing O M Tweet with you all yesterday. It makes us even more excited for OMC this summer! Thanks so much for playing! Here are a few photos you all sent in!

 

Jessica Herrell

Jessica is a Maryville College grad with a Physical Ed and Health degree, and has worked at camp since 2009. Jessica joined our office team as the department intern in August 2011.

Apr

19

2012

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O M Tweet… From the Creators of OMC

If you are familiar with CentriKid at all, you know that OMC is something we love. We love it because it’s funny, messy, and silly; yet, it still provides a great illustration of the Body of Christ and how we all play a different role in that.

 In honor of today being Thursday, we are going to play a round of OMC. Are you ready!? Here’s how it’s going to work:

  •  We will post 4 different tasks on our Twitter (@centrikidcamps) and Facebook (@centrikid). One posted each at 11:00AM CST, 1:00PM CST, 3:00PM CST, and 5:00PM CST.
  •  Do the task!
  •  Once you perform the task, take a picture. Then, tweet or post it to Facebook as soon as you can. There will be bonus points for the first ones to post each task!
  • Finally, tomorrow we will share our favorite photos here on the CentriKid Blog.

 

Love OMC so much that you play it at your church? Check out our free OMC Bonus Editions!

 

Jessica Herrell, Department Intern, absolutely loves OMC. In fact, after this summer, she will have participated in exactly 52 OMCs!!! Yes, she kept count. Check out some more fun posts about  OMC.

Jessica Herrell

Jessica is a Maryville College grad with a Physical Ed and Health degree, and has worked at camp since 2009. Jessica joined our office team as the department intern in August 2011.

The Unobstructed View

 

I’ve been thinking a lot about leadership recently. A friend gave me an article about the greatest blessing of leadership. The blessing that the author talked about was having an unobstructed view. I completely agree…however, I know there have definitely been times when I have felt like the view was incredibly foggy.

With my experience as a Camp Director, I know that most days I’m the one that gets to see the whole picture. Not only do I hear about every first aid call, but I have the privilege of hearing about all of the really cool things that happen at camp, both from the team leaders and from the church group leaders. That’s such an exciting part of my job and leadership in general!

It’s not always a clear view, but here’s the fun part: As a leader, you get to see the most. It may be a really clear day where you can see forever or a cloudy day where you can see just enough. Don’t let those cloudy days get you discouraged. You have the ability to make the cloudy days clear for those who are following you. Tell them what you are seeing, where you are going, and how you are going to get there.

Jen Hall is our camp intern. She will be directing CK2 at Campbellsville this summer. Keep up with Jen via twitter.

Jen Hall

Jen graduated from Morehead State University, and has worked at CentriKid Camps since 2007.

Apr

17

2012

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2012 Camp Prep #12 : 2 Weeks Before Camp

It is mid-April and for CentriKid staff, we are just a few weeks from staff training … and just over a month away from our very first weeks of camp for the summer.

The “Camp Prep” series is all about getting you ready for arriving at camp, so today we’ve got a quick checklist of things that need to happen in the couple of weeks before you get to CentriKid.

Group Leaders…remember that detailed info and instructions are in Group Leader information which is online at our main CentriKid site.

Here are a couple of other reminders for preparation a couple of weeks before you arrive at camp:

  • Download Church Group Devotions.  The file is found on the Group Leader Info page.  We’ve prepared the church group devotion materials to help continue the conversation with your church kids after worship ends.  These are not required…but just a helpful guide to use as you close out the day.
  • Email us your participant list.  This is the roster of all the kids and adults coming to camp with you.  It goes to the camp team’s email address (this is found in Group Leader Info for your location on page 4).  Please notify us if there are last-minute changes to your roster after you send it. (NEW: this is where you order your Camper Care Packages this year)
  • Take the call.  We are working on housing in advance and we want to get in touch with you to ask questions or update you about it.  The director or assistant director for the team will get in touch with you prior to camp, so be ready with your questions for them too!
  • Make final payments.  The balance of your camp fee is due 2 weeks out, so make your payment online (here’s a video to help w/ online payments) or by calling the folks in Events Registration at 1-877-CAMP-123.

We look forward to seeing what God does in the lives of kids and adults at camp.  By taking care of these details up front, we’ll have a smooth start to the week so you can focus on your kids!

Jeremy Echols

JE leads the camp team, finds new camp locations, plans training, and lots of other projects. He loves spending family time with his wife Emily and their daughter Madison.